February 12, 2019, Meeting

Publish Date 03/22/2019

MINUTES OF THE
BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS MEETING
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2019 

A meeting of the Board of Police Commissioners of Kansas City, Missouri was held on Tuesday, February 12, 2019, at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust Street, Kansas City.

PRESENT:

Commissioner Nathan Garrett, President
Commissioner Leland M. Shurin, Vice-President
Commissioner Don Wagner, Treasurer
Commissioner Mark Tolbert, Member
Mayor Sylvester “Sly” James, Jr., Member
Mr. David V. Kenner, Secretary/Attorney
Richard C. Smith, Chief of Police

This meeting was called to order at 9:29 a.m. by Commissioner Garrett. Fleet Operations Unit personnel led the Pledge of Allegiance. Chaplain Joshua Paszkiewicz provided the invocation.

  1. Awards and Commendations. The Meritorious Service Award was presented to Detective Jason Decker. Detective Decker has spent 12 of his nearly 17 years on the Department as a member of the Drug Enforcement Unit. He started out working under-cover for two years in the Street Crimes Unit, purchasing guns and drugs and obtaining search warrants for the investigations he initiated. His experience and work ethic led to him being chosen as a founding member of the Illegal Firearms Squad, which began in 2009. This unique Squad paired four KCPD detectives with four ATF agents, and a supervisor from each agency, to develop investigations related to violent crimes involving firearms. Over the past decade, Detective Decker and the Squad have been involved in a multitude of investigations, from homicides to international firearms trafficking.

         Detective Decker was heavily involved in one of the Squad’s first investigations, Operation Mynor League. This involved a Guatemalan national buying guns in the United States and sending them to Guatemala, hidden inside cars that were being shipped in containers. In exchange, cocaine would be send back to him, and he distributed it through a variety of criminal sources. Detective Decker and the Squad stopped this trafficking operation, which resulted in the seizure of 13 kilos of cocaine and the arrest of 11 people.

         It spun up another year-long investigation that focused on a major weapons dealer named Ramon Chavez, who was working in Mexico and America. Detective Decker and his fellow Squad members had to travel throughout the country to gather the evidence needed to federally indict 12 people and stop a major international gun-trafficking ring.

         Detective Decker was also integral to Operation Ink Guns and investigations into John Craig, Dale Willis and the Highway Shooter, as well as numerous violent crime cases.

         The Meritorious Service Award was presented to Sergeant Richard Sharp. Sergeant Sharp has held one of the Department’s most demanding positions, Homicide Squad supervisor, for more than 14 years. Sergeant Sharp has supervised more than 200 murder investigations, as well as more than 25 officer-involved shooting investigations. In addition, he has served as the coordinator of the Metro Squad since 2009.

         The Metro Squad brings together experienced local detectives to assist smaller local agencies, who do not have the resources to investigate homicides. Sergeant Sharp’s duties as coordinator include everything from training detectives from participating agencies, to working with the board of local police chiefs, to calling the squad together and leading them on a case. Under his leadership the past 10 years, the Metro Squad has worked more than 35 cases with a clearance rate of 85 percent.

         Sergeant Sharp has handled his share of high-profile cases, as well. Most recently was the murder of an attorney on the front steps of his Brookside home after he’d walked his child to school. After nearly six months of very hard work, and under intense pressure and scrutiny, a suspect was arrested and charged. He also helped get three people charged with the murder of a little boy who was shot and killed inside his home in 2015. In 2010, Sergeant Sharp and his squad led the cold case homicide investigation into the murder of civil rights leading Leon Jordan in 1970. They generated 117 new leads. After three and a half months, the squad presented their findings to the Jackson County Prosecutor’s Office, which determined the three suspects they’d identified were responsible, and closed the case because the suspects were all deceased. During the course of that investigation, Sergeant Sharp’s and his squad discovered another open case from 1968 and solved it, bringing closure to the victim’s family after 42 years.  

         The Certificate of Commendation was presented to Officer Devin Jackson. Just before midnight on July 23, 2018, police got a call that a man and woman were threatening to jump off a bridge in the Downtown Loop onto 670 Highway. Officer Jackson was not dispatched, but was nearby and responded with the dispatched officers. They saw a man and woman standing at the bridge’s railing when they arrived. A sergeant quickly talked the woman back, but the man remained agitated and warned officers to stay away.

         The man swung a leg over the railing and was clearly under the influence of narcotics. He was angry that he’d been refused detox treatment at a hospital. Officer Jackson tried to calm him down. He repeatedly assured the man that he was going to get him to a hospital to get him the help he needed. The man said he’d been in handcuffs for 16 years, and refused to be in handcuffs again. Officer Jackson responded that if he got down, they could just walk to the back of the patrol wagon without handcuffs. The man also said he was thirsty, and Officer Jackson offered him his own Gatorade.

         Officer Jackson continued to build rapport and negotiate with the man for 25 minutes. Officer Jackson remained calm as the man’s agitation levels fluctuated and when he swung both legs over the railing and leaned backward over the highway. When the man became angry because he thought his girlfriend had been taken away in an ambulance, Officer Jackson showed him she was still there, and had his sergeant bring her over. Once that happened, the man climbed off the rail and walked over to the patrol wagon. As promised, Officer Jackson did not handcuff him and gave him his Gatorade. The man was transported to the hospital for treatment.

         The Certificates of Commendation were presented to Sergeant Andrew ‘A.J.’ Henry, Officer Devin Jackson, Officer Ian Morris, Officer Jacob Phillips, and Social Services Coordinator Gina English. At about 2:00 a.m. on June 28, 2018, a security guard in a parking garage in the Power and Light District called police to report a family sleeping in the garage stairwell. Officers Jackson and Phillips responded, followed by Sergeant Henry. They found a woman and her three children, ages 4, 2 and 7 months.

         They learned the family had arrived in Kansas City two days before on a bus from California. The father of the eldest child had been murdered, and the mother said she and her children needed to leave for their safety. They have no family in Kansas City, but came here because they’d received a letter from the Housing Authority of Kansas City about public housing.

         The officers called around the City looking for shelters with openings for the family, but all were full. They chose not to call the Jackson County Children’s Division for fear they would split up the family, who had already endured great hardship.

         Sergeant Henry called KCPD Social Services Coordinator Gina English. Even though it was 2:00 a.m., she answered and said she could get help for the family. She told the officers to take the mother and her children to the Central Patrol Division. Officer Morris retrieved car seats for the children from the station.

         Once the officers got everyone to CPD, Sergeant Henry, Ms. English, and Officers Jackson, Morris and Phillips pooled together money from their own pockets to get the family a hotel room since no other shelter was available. Family members of the officers brought the family diapers, wipes, clothes, hygiene products, toys and food. Through Truman Medical Center and the Missouri Highway Patrol, the family got car seats to keep. Social workers have since gotten the family into transitional and then permanent housing, as well as a car and other resources to get them back on their feet.

The Board took a recess at 9:43 a.m. The meeting resumed at 9:54 a.m.

  1. Councilperson Alissia Canady. Councilperson Canady expressed her condolences to the family of the KCPD Officer that passed away on February 10, 2019.

Councilperson Canady spoke about a resolution that she introduced to the Council. The resolution calls for discussions between the City and the Department, to outline a process that achieves adequate patrol staffing levels, that will provide commitment to officer safety and financial responsibility with long range planning for five years. The resolution directs the City Manager to reach out to the Department to begin these discussions.

  1. Chief Richard C. Smith. Chief Smith thanked the members of the Department, the Narcotics and Vice Unit, the Wellness Unit, and the Fraternal Order of Police for their support to the family of the KCPD Officer that passed away over the weekend.

         Chief Smith advised that Rutger’s University will be visiting the Department on February 26, 2019, to speak about risk terrain modeling. The class will be provided to commanders and crime analysts. Risk Terrain Modeling is a geographical approach to crime fighting that uses layering maps and environmental factors to determine crime.

  1. Approval of minutes. A motion was made by Mayor James, with a second by Commissioner Tolbert, to approve the minutes of the open meeting on January 8, 2019. The vote was 5-0 in favor.

  2. Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 99. Sergeant Brad Lemon spoke about the FOP’s 2018 Christmas events. The Cops for Kids program provided Christmas gifts to 180 children in the City. The FOP also provided backpacks filled with toys to 350 students at Wendell Phillips Elementary School. In addition, they provided Christmas to 30 foster children and 12 additional children that were referred by patrol officers. Sergeant Lemon thanked all of the FOP sponsors for their donations that make these events possible.

         Sergeant Lemon advised he is traveling to Nashville later this week to have discussion with national leaders about addressing crisis in officers. He noted that something different needs to be done, and that we’ve got to reach out before crisis occurs. People in crisis do not call for help. Sergeant Lemon stated that he had called every officer involved in a shooting in the last several years to see how they were doing.  

         Sergeant Lemon stated that 700 people attended the FOP ball last Saturday.    

  1. Executive Services Bureau. Major Karen True spoke for Deputy Chief Roger Lewis during his absence. Major True presented the following items for Board approval:
    a. Budget Transfers for Fiscal Year 2018-19. A memorandum dated

February 1, 2019, was presented to recommend approval of budget transfers. This budget transfer will affect the General Fund, Public Safety Sales Tax Fund, Police Drug Enforcement Fund, Police Grants Fund and the Grants Special Revenue Fund.

         A motion was made by Commissioner Shurin, with a second by Commissioner Wagner, to approve the budget transfers as presented. The vote was 5-0 in favor.
       b.  Adjustment to Special Revenue Accounts for Fiscal Year 2018-19. A memorandum dated February 1, 2019, was presented to recommend the sum of $515,000 be appropriated from the Unappropriated Fund Balance of the Liability Self-Retention Fund to the Settlement Account in the Liability Self-Retention Fund.

         A motion was made by Commissioner Shurin, with a second by Mayor James, to adjust the special revenue accounts as presented. The vote was 5-0 in favor.
        c.  Renewal Bid No. 2015-1, Ballistic Protection Vests. A memorandum dated January 23, 2019, was presented to recommend approval of a one-year renewal to the 2015 Alamar Uniforms, now Gall’s Uniforms, and Ed Roehr Safety Products contract. The contract contained provision of renewal for four additional one-year periods, based upon mutually agreeable pricing, availability of funding and quality of service. This is fourth and final renewal of this contract for the period of April 1, 2019, through March 31, 2020. The bid consists of the following items: 1) Armor Express Seraph SERG2-A-IIIA Male Concealable Vest Package, 2) Armor Express Seraphy SERG2-A-IIIA Female Concealable Vest Package, 3) Armor Express STP Soft Trauma Pack, 4) Armor Express Evolution Carrier Replacement, and 5) Protech Tactical APV-MRO1-3A with 6 pouches, ID panel set, ballistic sleeves, carry case with two PTA-2230 LVL IV rifle plates and optional multi strike vest. In the contract, Items #1-4 are to be provided by Gall’s Uniforms and Item #5, with the option of the multiple strike vest, is provided by Ed Roehr Safety Products. The total anticipated expenditure is $194,590.00.

       A motion was made by Commissioner Tolbert, with a second by Mayor James, to approve the the fourth and final renewal of the contract with Gall’s Uniforms and Ed Roehr Safety Products, at a total expenditure of $194,590.00. The vote was 5-0 in favor.
          d.  Purchase of TruNarc Devices and Kits. A memorandum dated February 6, 2019, was presented to recommend approval of the purchase of six (6) TruNarc detection devices and corresponding kits for each device from Fisher Scientific, at a total cost of $169,491.00, using the HGACBuy Contract #EP11-17. Identified funding sources are 50 percent from the Police Foundation and 50 percent from the Public Safety Sales Tax fund. Each patrol division will now have one of these devices and kits.

         A motion was made by Commissioner Tolbert, with a second by by Commissioner Wagner, to approve the purchase of six TruNarc devices and corresponding kits, at a total expenditure of $169,491.00. The vote was 5-0 in favor.
          e.  Department Wireless Service. A memorandum dated January 4, 2019, was presented to recommend approval of a one-year contract to provide wireless services utilizing the National Association of State Procurement Officials (NASPO) contracts for the period of February 12, 2019, through January 31, 2020. The anticipated annual expenditure for the renewal period is $370,042.66 for wireless cellular and E-ticketing device service, and $272,088.09 for the wireless air card service, at a total annual expenditure of $642,130.75.

         A motion was made by Mayor James, with a second by Commissioner Shurin, to approve a one-year contract with NASPO, to provide wireless services, at a total anticipated expenditure of $642,130.75. The vote was 5-0 in favor.

Major Daniel Gates provided an update on the Communications Unit. He advised that in January 2019, the Call Center received 75,660 calls, and 21,686 of them were received through the 911 system. The 911 hold time for the month of January 2019 was 13 seconds, compared to 11 seconds in December 2018 and 18 seconds in January 2018. Major Gates advised that the Communications Unit is currently staffed with 98 members, leaving eight vacant positions. A new call taker class of six will begin February 19, 2019. In response to a question, Major Gates advised that 1,103.9 hours of overtime were worked in the Communications Unit in January 2019. A majority of the overtime is being worked on the dispatcher side of the Unit. Currently there are four members completing training to become dispatchers. A new dispatcher class will begin in March.

  1. Professional Development and Research Bureau. Major Diane Mozzicato spoke for Deputy Chief Bob Kuehl during his absence. Major Mozzicato presented the Academy Class Summary for February 2019. She advised that the 166th Entrant Officer Class (E.O.C.) will begin the Academy on Tuesday, February 19, 2019. The Department has extended offers to 37 applicants for placement in the 166th E.O.C. A lateral class of five members will begin on February 19, 2019, as well.

         Major Mozzicato requested Board approval for the following consent agenda items:
         a.  Project #1135: Arrests of Military Deserters
         b.  Project #1136: Missouri Department of Revenue Suspension/Revocation Actions

A motion was made by Commissioner Shurin, with a second by Commissioner

Tolbert, to approve the consent agenda items as presented. The vote was 5-0 in favor.

         Major Mozzicato advised that Academy Sports donated $100 gift certificates to 25 PAL kids. They also donated a $2,500 gift certificate to the PAL Center, to be used for athletic gear for the kids.

  1. Investigations Bureau. Deputy Chief David Bosworth presented the Investigations Bureau report for January 2019. Deputy Chief Bosworth advised that to-date 2019, there have been 15 homicides, compared to 11 at this time last year. There have been 48 living shooting victims identified as of February 10, 2019, compared to 49 at for the same time period last year. There have been 43 drive by shootings in 2019, compared to 24 at this time last year. The Department has recovered 245 firearms to-date 2019, and submitted 29 felon-in-possession cases.

         Deputy Chief Bosworth advised that patrol officers, along with Narcotics and Vice detectives, are seeing an increase of methamphetamine and cocaine. Detectives seized 43 pounds of methamphetamine earlier this month, along with 1,900 fentanyl pills. Prescription pills and opiates recovered this year totals 43 dosage units.      

         Deputy Chief Bosworth spoke about Project Safe Neighborhoods, a nationwide initiative that brings together federal, state and local law enforcement, prosecutors, and community leaders, to identify and address the violent crime problems in the community with the prevention, intervention and enforcement method. The Project Safe Neighborhoods initiative is a geographical approach to crime fighting. Deputy Chief Bosworth also spoke about the Public Safety Partnership. The group has adopted a target and identification system that uses data to identify and focus on the City’s most violent criminals as individuals. Some of the data used to document individuals is gang members to their affiliates, arrest or offense with a firearm, violent criminal history, probation and parole release, and victim or suspect in a shooting.   Tampa Bay currently uses the same system.        

  1. Administration Bureau. Mr. Bob Charlesworth, Charlesworth Consulting, presented the Health Care Benefit Summary effective May 1, 2019 – April 30, 2020. Mr. Charlesworth recommended the Department remain with BlueCross BlueShield of Kansas City. He also recommended adding a qualified high deductible health plan with Spira Care, and eliminating the HMO1 low enrollment program. The HMO1 low enrollment program should be replaced with an exclusive provider organization with Spira Care, which also provides out of area coverage. He also noted that the Benefit Committee reviewed an RFP for a voluntary vision base plan, with the buy-up option. The plans will be evaluated by the Committee before the information is submitted to the Board.

         A motion was made by Commissioner Shurin, with a second by Mayor James, to approve the health, dental and life insurance renewal, along with the Employee Assistance Program renewal, with BlueCross BlueShield of Kansas City, effective May 1, 2019. The vote was 5-0 in favor.

         Deputy Chief Oakman provided an update on projects being completed by the Information Services Division. In 2017, the Department implemented a new computer-aided dispatch (CAD) system, replacing the 20-year-old Legacy system. Currently, the Department is transitioning into Niche, a records management system. Records management systems are used to write police reports and manage case files. Niche is replacing Tiburon, which has been used by the Department since 2007. Niche will be fully implemented at the beginning of March 2019. In May 2019, the Department will be moving from the Regional Justice Information Service (REJIS) to Missouri Uniform Law Enforcement System (MULES). In addition to the system updates, the Information Services Division is working on a project to bring mobile ticketing to officers. These changes in Department technology will increase efficiency and are more user-friendly. He noted that through a partnership with Sprint, additional cell towers have been added through the City, improving the Department’s mobile coverage.

         Deputy Chief Oakman provided an update on the OneIT initiative. He advised that the City’s data center has been consolidated with the Department’s data system. Merging the two data centers has resulted in significant financial savings.      

         Deputy Chief Oakman provided a recruitment update. He advised that the Academy will host a Family Night this evening at 6:00 p.m. for the 166th Entrant Officer Class. He advised that 36 members have confirmed their spot in the 166th E.O.C. Of those 36, there are 20 white males, five black males, three Hispanic males, seven white females, and one black female. He also noted that the Department has hired its first student from Manual Tech Career Center. Pedro Garcia will be joining the Department next week in the Fleet Operations Unit.

Deputy Chief Oakman presented the Regional Criminalistics Division monthly statistics for February 2018 and the Human Resources Personnel Summary dated February 6, 2019. For this time period, Department strength is 1,306 sworn law enforcement and 553 career civilians.

Chief Smith noted that the move from REJIS to MULES will be a major cost savings for the Department and City.

  1. Patrol Bureau. Deputy Chief Sharon Laningham shared photos of officers interacting with citizens at events throughout the City during the month of January.

Deputy Chief Laningham presented the Monthly Crime and Offense Summary dated December 2018. She advised that the average response times for Priority 10 calls was 7.45 minutes, below the goal of 7.50 minutes. Response times for Priority 20 calls was 9.57 minutes, with a goal of nine minutes.

Deputy Chief Laningham presented the Traffic Summary for the month of January 2019. There have been 13,017 total citations issued to-date 2019, compared to 10,939 at this time last year. There have been 36 City DUI arrests, and 44 additional cases submitted for state prosecution. There have been 5 fatality motor vehicle accidents in to-date 2019, compared to 5 at this time last year.

  1. Office of General Counsel. General Counsel Jenny Atterbury presented the following Private Officer License appeals:
    a.  Private Officer License Appeal, Ms. Sandrann Wilson. A memorandum dated January 9, 2019, was presented to recommend denial of the unarmed private security license of Ms. Sandrann Wilson. The basis of the denial is outlined in Title 17 of the Code of State Regulations 10-2.050, Section (3)(P), which stipulates each applicant applying for a license under these provisions must meet these standards, “Being terminated from or resigning under investigation or threat of discharge from the department shall make an individual ineligible for a license.” Ms. Wilson was terminated from the Kansas City, Missouri Police Department on October 14, 2010.

         A motion was made by Commissioner Shurin, with a second by Mayor James, to uphold the appeal and grant the unarmed private security license to Ms. Sandrann Wilson. The vote was 5-0 in favor.
         b.  Private Officer License Appeal, Mr. Royce L. Turner. A memorandum dated January 22, 2019, was presented to recommend the denial of the unarmed private security license of Mr. Royce L. Turner. The basis for the denial is outlined in Title 17 of the Code of State Regulations 10-2.050, Section (3)(H), which stipulates each applicant applying for a license under these provisions must meet these standards, “He/she must be of good moral character by having no felony convictions, misdemeanor convictions, or city ordinance violations, which have an essential element fraud, dishonesty, and act of violence, bribery, illegal drug use, sexual misconduct, and other similar acts constituting moral turpitude.” Mr. Turner had a felony conviction for Assault with Intent to Kill on July 24, 1967. Mr. Turner stated the conviction was expunged. The Private Officer Licensing Unit received confirmation from MSHP Criminal Records Division advising they have no record or any expungement.

            A motion was made by Mayor James, with a second by Commissioner Tolbert, to uphold the appeal and grant the unarmed private security license to Mr. Royce L. Turner. The vote was 5-0 in favor.

  1. Office of Community Complaints. Director Merrell Bennekin spoke about the Badges & Baseball event that was held on February 9, 2019. Chief Smith and Commissioner Garrett thanked Director Bennekin for the community policing initiatives that the Office of Community Complaints is involved in.

  2. Audit Committee. Commissioner Wagner advised that an audit was conducted on juvenile booking procedures. Review of those procedures revealed minor booking failures and equipment malfunctions. The Quality Control Unit has since updated the juvenile booking policy and the equipment. North and Central Patrol Divisions are now exclusive juvenile booking facilities.

         An audit of the shift differential pay scale revealed that some members working on Watch II were receiving shift differential pay. Members on Watch I and Watch III are the only members that are supposed to receive the shift differential pay. Changes have been made, so there are no longer any members on Watch II receiving the extra pay.

         The Audit Committee met with Violent Crimes Squad 2040 & 2050. The Squads’ operations were reviewed and tweaked to follow their mission.      

  1. Mr. David V. Kenner. Mr. Kenner advised the Board that it’s time to schedule the final budget transfers telephone conference meeting and the Audit Committee meeting. The Board members will check their calendars, and provide Mr. Kenner with their availability to schedule these meetings.

  2. Commissioner Mark Tolbert. Commissioner Tolbert expressed his concerns with pedestrians crossing 71 Highway, north of Gregory Blvd. There is currently no crosswalk in the area. Chief Smith advised that the Traffic Division will contact MODOT in regard.

  3. Scheduled meetings.

         The Board of Police Commissioners of Kansas City, Missouri has scheduled the following meetings:

March 19, 2019, 9:30 a.m., at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust, Kansas City.

April 9, 2019, 9:30 a.m., at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust, Kansas City.

May 14, 2019, 9:30 a.m., at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust, Kansas City.

June 11, 2019, 9:30 a.m., at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust, Kansas City.

July 9, 2019, 9:30 a.m., at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust, Kansas City.

August 20, 2019, 9:30 a.m., at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust, Kansas City.

September 17, 2019, 9:30 a.m., at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust, Kansas City.

October 22, 2019, 9:30 a.m., at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust, Kansas City.

November 19, 2019, 9:30 a.m., at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust, Kansas City.

December 10, 2019, 9:30 a.m., at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust, Kansas City.

         A motion was made by Commissioner Wagner, with a second by Commissioner Shurin, and by vote indicated below, to adjourn its open meeting at 11:58 a.m. and reconvene in closed session as provided in the following resolution. Following a roll call, the vote was 5-0 in favor.

RESOLUTION

WHEREAS, notice of the board meeting of the Board of Police Commissioners was given on August 24, 2018, and
WHEREAS, said notice indicated that the Board of Police Commissioners might go into closed session during said meeting, and
WHEREAS, notice of the closed meeting follows the guidelines of Section 610.020 of the Revised Statutes of Missouri.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of Police Commissioners go into closed session during the meeting being held on Tuesday, February 12, 2019, at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust Street, Kansas City, for the purpose of discussing personnel matters, labor negotiations, and litigation matters.

The following Commissioners were present and voted to go into closed session as follows:      

         Commissioner Nathan Garrett                        -        Aye
         Commissioner Leland Shurin                          -        Aye
         Commissioner Don Wagner                            -        Aye
         Commissioner Mark Tolbert                            -        Aye
         Mayor Sylvester “Sly” James                           -        Aye

There being a quorum present and the question of holding a closed session having received an affirmative public vote of at least three (3) members, a closed meeting was held as set forth above.

Below are the votes from the closed session of the Board of Police Commissioners meeting on February 12, 2018:

The Board went into closed session at 12:12 p.m.

1)      Following a motion by Commissioner Shurin and a second by Mayor James, the Board voted to approve the application for continued employment of M.P.O. Ann Malnar. The vote was 5-0 in favor. Following polling, Commissioner Garrett voted Aye, Mayor James voted Aye, Commissioner Shurin voted Aye, Commissioner Tolbert voted Aye, and Commissioner Wagner voted Aye.

2)      Following a motion by Mayor James and a second by Commissioner Tolbert, the Board voted to approve the minutes of the closed sessions of the Board of Police Commissioners on January 8, 2019, and on January 14, 2019. The vote was 5-0 in favor. Following polling, Commissioner Garrett voted Aye, Mayor James voted Aye, Commissioner Shurin voted Aye, Commissioner Tolbert voted Aye, and Commissioner Wagner voted Aye.

3)      Following a motion by Commissioner Shurin and a second by Commissioner Tolbert, the Board voted to come out of closed session and adjourn. The vote was 5-0 in favor. Following polling, Commissioner Garrett voted Aye, Mayor James voted Aye, Commissioner Shurin voted Aye, Commissioner Tolbert voted Aye, and Commissioner Wagner voted Aye.

The meeting adjourned at 12:42 p.m.          

 

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Secretary/Attorney

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President                               

        

Board of Police Commissioners Minutes