August 25th, 2020 Meeting

Publish Date 08/25/2020

MINUTES OF THE 

BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS MEETING

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2020

 

A meeting of the Board of Police Commissioners of Kansas City, Missouri was held on Tuesday, August 25, 2020, at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust Street, Kansas City.

PRESENT:

Commissioner Don Wagner, President

Commissioner Mark Tolbert, Vice President

Commissioner Cathy Dean, Treasurer

Commissioner Nathan Garrett, Member

Mayor Quinton Lucas, Member

        Mr. David V. Kenner, Secretary/Attorney

Richard C. Smith, Chief of Police

 

This meeting was called to order at 9:32 a.m. by Commissioner Wagner.  Commissioner Tolbert provided the invocation.  The Board adopted Board Resolution 20-03 in memory of Former Commissioner Bailus M. Tate.    

  1. FY2019-20 Resident Survey. Kate Bender, from the City’s Office of Performance Management, presented the Fiscal Year 2019-20 Resident Satisfaction Survey results.  Ms. Bender explained that the survey gives an annual opportunity to measure outcomes of the City services, identify differences between demographic or user groups, and gauge citizens’ relative priorities for different services.  Ms. Bender detailed the citizen feedback regarding police service throughout the City. She explained that police services ranked number two in importance on the residents’ priority scale, falling just behind the streets, sidewalks and infrastructure category.   According to the survey, 57 percent of members in the community were satisfied/very satisfied with police service in the City, 26 percent were neutral, and 17 percent were dissatisfied/very dissatisfied.  Twenty-eight percent of residents are satisfied with the City’s overall efforts to prevent crime; the national average for this category is 41 percent satisfaction.  Thirty-eight percent of residents are satisfied with the visibility of police presence in neighborhoods; the national average for this category is 42 percent satisfaction.  Forty-three percent of residents are satisfied with the response times of police in emergency situations; the national average for this category is 55 percent satisfaction.  Fifty-two percent of residents are satisfied with the effectiveness of local police protection, 43 percent are satisfied with the enforcement of local travel laws and 40 percent are satisfied with the parking enforcement services; these satisfaction numbers are slightly down from last year.  Forty percent of residents that responded to the survey had contact with a KCPD officer within the last year, and 14 percent of those individuals were victims of a crime; 27 percent of surveyors reported calling 911 in the last year.      
  2. Councilwoman Heather Hall. Councilwoman Hall advised that Council voted to decrease budgets across City Departments by 4.5 percent, with the exception of public safety.  KCPD’s and KCFD’s budgets will only be cut by 2.25 percent; the Police Department’s budget will be reduced by approximately $5.6 million.  Councilwoman Hall advised that she wrote a Resolution last week suggesting that the City conduct an audit on the big picture of the operations at City Hall and not by individual departments that provide services to the citizens of Kansas City.  An auditor will visit City Hall on December 2, 2020, to discuss ways to cut overall spending.

        Councilwoman Hall advised that personnel in Jackson County, Missouri have not shown interest in sharing a jail with the City.  She also advised that she is working on a model jail diversion program with Judge Corey Carter.  The project is co-sponsored by Mayor Lucas.  The goal is a 30-day pilot project to discuss mental health and develop a plan that puts people in contract with the services they need most.  Councilwoman Hall advised that she will share the findings of this project with the Department in the future. 

        In response to a question from Commissioner Garrett, Chief Smith advised that Jackson County and the City did not come together on a solution for new jail construction.  Mayor Lucas added in reference to Councilwoman Hall’s comments, the model jail diversion program would be a collaboration with Municipal Court and Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Officers to provide alternatives to sentencing.  Mayor Lucas also advised that there is no new progress on long-term jail discussions/solutions with Jackson County.  Jackson County continues to conduct studies, and the City’s jail discussions are frozen at this time due to budget issues.  In response to a question by Commissioner Garrett, Mayor Lucas advised that a collaborative solution has not been met between Jackson County and the City due mostly to bureaucratic reasons and disagreement.             

  1. Chief of Police Richard C. Smith. Chief Richard Smith provided a COVID-19 update.  He advised that as of today, 863 Department members have been tested for the virus.  Of the 863 tested, 12 members are currently positive, 50 members have returned to work, and 24 are currently quarantined for safety measures.  Overall, 62 members have tested positive.  He advised that a majority of the members that have tested positive have had mild allergy-like symptoms.  A number of members have experienced loss of taste.  

        Chief Smith advised that he has been meeting with area pastors Darron Edwards, Ronald Lindsay, and Emanuel Cleaver III to discuss the ‘Getting to Heart of the Matter’ initiative.  This initiative is a faith-based policing targeted approach.  The Department is using the Community Interaction Officers (CIOs) to identify faith-based organizations and leaders across the City that wish to take part in this initiative.  The Department will be sending out weekly newsletters to these organizations that provide updates on Department recruiting efforts, funding opportunities, hiring processes, etc. 

        Chief Smith spoke about the Teens in Transition program.  This program connects at-risk youth with school resource officers across the City for after-school activities.  He advised that Michael Toombs, a local artist, provided art classes to the youth through ArtsTech.  A study revealed that 65 percent of the youth that have attended this program in the past did not have any police contact within a year of the program.  Michael Toombs will be participating in this program again this year.    

        Chief Smith spoke about a recent article published in The Kansas City Star.  Chief Smith advised that The Star’s statistics regarding the Department’s homicide clearance rates were inaccurate.  He advised that the Department’s current overall clearance rate for 2020 is 70 percent.  Chief Smith noted that is above the national average.  He also noted that 62 homicides from this year have been cleared, along with 27 additional homicides that occurred in 2019.  The Star counts officer-involved shootings in their totals, but that national, federal, and KCPD standards do not.  The Board advised Chief Smith to send the correct statistics to The Star for clarification.  Chief Smith is also releasing a blog in regard.

        In response to a question, Deputy Chief Francisco advised that last year’s clearance rate was considerably less during this same time frame.  For the time period of January-August 2019, the clearance rate was approximately 40 percent and the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) was just over 50 percent.  This year’s rates are trending higher than in years past.  In response to another question, Deputy Chief Francisco advised that cases are not considered cleared until charges are filed and the suspect is in custody. 

        Chief Smith provided an update on Operation LeGend.  Preliminary statistics for the first six weeks of Operation LeGend are as follows: aggravated assaults decreased by 48 percent, strong-arm robberies are down 24 percent, homicides are down 15 percent, and bullet-to-skin shootings (non-fatal) are down 25 percent.  Overall, there has been a 30 percent reduction in violent crime in Kansas City since additional federal resources arrived.  These statistics were determined by comparing violent crime numbers to the same time frame in 2019.

        Chief Smith explained that Kansas City has been a model for Operation LeGend.  Resources are focusing on truly violent people that have been involved in homicides and illegal firearms.  Chief Smith spoke about the positive relationships that KCPD has with its federal partners.  In response to a question from Mayor Lucas, Chief Smith was unsure if Operation LeGend would extend past the 60-day trial time.  Chief Smith advised that the Department will continue to stay engaged with these investigations after Operation LeGend is completed, and is thankful for the additional resources provided during Operation LeGend. 

  1. Public Comments. Members of the public submitted comments to the Board through the Board of Police Commissioners’ email address, bopc@kcpd.org.  The Board received 134 written comments in total as of 7:30 a.m. on Tuesday, August 25, 2020.  A breakdown of the comments is as follows: six emails recommending changes to the use of force policy, such as placing bans on chokeholds, knee holds, strangleholds, and the use of tear gas, two emails calling for justice for Ryan Stokes, Donnie Sanders, Cameron Lamb, and Terrance Bridges, 64 emails in support of Chief Smith, ten additional emails offering support to the men and women of KCPD, four emails calling for the immediate removal of Chief Smith, nine emails expressing concerns with the Mayor gaining local control and requests that the Department remain under State control governed by the Board, and six emails were against defunding the police and the budget cuts from the City.  A number of female officers emphasized that it was appropriate to include them as minorities in the Department’s employment reports because women have historically been underrepresented within the Department.  Many individuals commented on their support for Operation Legend and the Federal Agency assistance in Kansas City.  A number of people complained about how the Jackson County Prosecutor’s Office either plea bargains strong cases down or doesn’t bother to prosecute people at all.  Cass, Clay, and Platte County Prosecutors take a much harder line  Other topics were mentioned regarding the implementation of the 8 Can’t Wait reforms, Black Lives Matter and Back the Blue murals being painted throughout the City, suggestions to restructure the Department, including high ranking members, and changes to the community complaints process.  All of the public comments received will be published on the Department’s website following today’s meeting.
  2. Approval of minutes. A motion was made by Commissioner Tolbert, with a second by Commissioner Garrett, to approve the minutes of the open meeting on July 7, 2020.  The vote was 5-0 in favor.
  3. Executive Services Bureau. Deputy Chief Karen True presented the following items for Board approval:
  4. Budget Transfers for Fiscal Year 2020-21. A memorandum dated

August 14, 2020, was presented to recommend approval of budget transfers.  This budget transfer will affect the Police Grants Fund and the Grants Special Revenue Fund.

        A motion was made by Commissioner Dean, with a second by Commissioner Tolbert, to approve the budget transfers as presented.  The vote was 5-0 in favor. 

  1. Supplemental Appropriations for Fiscal Year 2020-21.  A memorandum dated August 18, 2020, was presented to recommend acceptance of City Ordinance 200563 and authorize an increase of $720,557 as a supplemental appropriation from the U.S. Department of Justice to assist in covering expenses related to the Coronavirus Pandemic.  In response to a question, Deputy Chief True explained that these funds will be used for overtime, cleaning supplies, and personal protective equipment. 

        A motion was made by Commissioner Tolbert, with a second by Commissioner Dean, to approve the supplemental appropriations as presented.  The vote was 5-0 in favor. 

  1. Donation Acceptance – Police Foundation of Kansas City.  A memorandum dated August 18, 2020, was presented to recommend acceptance of $900,000 from the Police Foundation of Kansas City.  These funds will be utilized for the purpose of funding Phase 1 of the Body-Worn Camera Project.

Major Paul Luster provided an update on the body-worn camera project.  The Department has created a shareholders work group to discuss community expectations, prosecutors’ expectations, software management, redactions, etc.  The Department will test a number of cameras for three weeks before the full release.  These cameras will be tested by officers in the Traffic Division, Central Patrol, and Shoal Creek Patrol Division.  The cameras are expected to be delivered by October 1, 2020.  In response to a question from Commissioner Dean, Major Luster explained that the body-worn cameras are linked to the in-car dash cameras.  These cameras will automatically activate and record if an officer’s lights and/or sirens are turned on.  Major Luster explained that the Department will procure 340 body-worn cameras in Phase 1.  The Department will have approximately 1,400 body-worn cameras once they are all purchased. 

        A motion was made by Commissioner Dean, with a second by Mayor Lucas, to accept $900,000 from the Police Foundation of Kansas City, to be used for the Body-Worn Camera Project.  The motion was 5-0 in favor.

  1. Adjustment to Special Revenue Accounts for Fiscal Year 2020-21.  A memorandum dated August 18, 2020, was presented to recommend $900,000 from the Private Donations fund be moved to the Audio/Visual Equipment fund.  This revenue and appropriation is needed for the procurement of Phase 1 of the body-worn camera project.

        A motion was made by Commissioner Dean, with a second by Mayor Lucas, to approve the adjustment to the Special Revenue Accounts as presented.  The vote was 5-0 in favor.

  1. RFP #2019-02 In-Vehicle Mounted Digital Video Recorders and Body-Worn Camera System and Software Management System.  A memorandum dated August 19, 2020, was presented to recommend approval for the award of RFP #2019-02 with Turn Key Mobile, Inc. for the Body-Worn Camera System Phase and hardware, software, and services, at a cost not to exceed $900,000.  Vendors have been identified, but are not all-inclusive for hardware, software, and services.  These vendors include ConvergeOne, Software House International, Sprint, and Dell.   

        A motion was made by Commissioner Dean, with a second by Mayor Lucas, to approve the award of RFP #2019-02 as presented.  The vote was 5-0 in favor. 

  1. KC-ETAC Purchases.  A memorandum dated August 18, 2020, was presented regarding KC-ETAC Purchases.  The Board of Police Commissioners is the fiduciary for the Kansas City Emerging Threats Analysis Capability (KC-ETAC), and the KC-ETAC Governing Board is requesting payment for the following subscription services: COPLINK/Forensic Logic, Thomson Reuters CLEAR Proflex, and Lexis-Nexis Virtual Crime Center.  The total expenditure is $607,089.29. 

        A motion was made by Commissioner Dean, with a second by Commissioner Tolbert, to approve payment in the amount of $607,089.29 for subscription services for KC-ETAC.  The vote was 5-0 in favor. 

  1. 2020 Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program.  A memorandum dated August 12, 2020, was presented to recommend acceptance of the 2020 Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP) Award 20-CMV-MC-005, in the amount of $1,341,478.20.  This award is 85 percent federally funded, with a 15 percent local match.  The award will be used for personnel, overtime, equipment, training and travel expenses for the Commercial Vehicle Inspection Section.  The award period is October 1, 2019 through September 30, 2021, with funding disbursements beginning July 1, 2020. 

        A motion was made by Commissioner Dean, with a second by Mayor Lucas, to accept MCSAP Award 20-CMV-MC-005 in the amount of $1,341,478.20.  The vote was 5-0 in favor.

  1. COPS Hiring Program Award 2020ULWX0004.  A memorandum dated August 13, 2020, was presented to recommend acceptance of the COPS Hiring Program Award 2020ULWX0004 in the amount of $3,675,522, and is for the award period of July 1, 2020 through June 30, 2023.  Funding from the grant will be used to hire 18 officers.  All 18 officer positions must be retained for 12 months after the federal funding ends. 

         In response to a question from Commissioner Garrett, Deputy Chief Karen True explained that advised that upon completion of the Academy, these officers will go to Patrol and nine tenured officers will be assigned to federal task forces.  Deputy Chief True advised that the Department will be hiring six additional applicants, for a total of 24, in case there is a loss of recruits in the Academy.

Commissioner Tolbert noted that the grant includes language requiring community policing.  Chief Smith explained that all of the initiatives the Department is involved in are considered community policing.  Commissioner Tolbert also spoke about minorities on the Department.  He stated that the Department needs to look like the community it serves.  Commissioner Garrett advised that there has been an absence of representation from minority groups.  Commissioner Dean agreed with Commissioner Tolbert, and emphasized the need to enhance recruitment efforts. 

In response to a question, Deputy Chief Wadle explained that the despite the hiring freeze, the Department is still processing law enforcement candidate applications.  There are currently 21 applicants in the hiring pool ready to begin the next Academy class.  Deputy Chief Wadle advised that the Department is always open to recruitment suggestions.  Deputy Chief Oakman noted that the Department should see better recruitment results in the future because focus has been put on the youth through programs such as the Summer Youth Academy and Police Explorers Program.       

        A motion was made by Commissioner Dean, with a second by Mayor Lucas, to accept the COPS Hiring Program Award 2020ULWX0004 in the amount of $3,675,522.  The vote was 5-0 in favor. 

Deputy Chief True provided an update on the Communications Unit.  She advised that the Communications Unit is currently staffed with 97 members, leaving nine vacant positions.  She also advised that five new hires will begin dispatch training on September 8, 2020.  Despite the hiring freeze, the Department is still recruiting for the Communications Unit. 

Deputy Chief True spoke about City Ordinance 200572.  This ordinance reduces KCPD’s budget by 2.25 percent, which is roughly $5.3 million.  Deputy Chief True explained that an additional $144,000 of funds paid by the City through the Department will be eliminated.  These funds are used for fuel.  The Department projects that salary savings and a $1 million reimbursement from City Aviation, for officer salary benefits, will cover this budget reduction. Also through salary savings, the Department is able to fund an October Academy class with 24 people.  In response to a question, Mayor Lucas advised that City Aviation is funded by airlines, parking, and concessions.  

  1. Professional Development and Research Bureau. Acting Deputy Chief Gregory Dull presented the Academy Class Summary for August 2020.  The 169th Entrant Officer Class is in their final weeks of training, and are currently going through situational training.  They will graduate on Thursday, September 10th.  The 170th Entrant Officer Class started the Academy yesterday.  This class only contains one KCPD recruit that was recycled due to an injury; the rest of the recruits are hired by outside agencies.  Deputy Chief Wadle advised that there are currently enough applicants in the hiring pool for another Academy class if they don’t get hired by another agency first. 

        Acting Deputy Chief Dull advised that the Police Athletic League (PAL) is averaging 18-20 kids in attendance per day.  On Friday, August 28th, PAL will hold their annual golf tournament.  There are 144 golfers signed up to play, and this is the biggest fundraiser of the year for PAL. 

        Acting Deputy Chief Dull advised that his discussion regarding the First Amendment policy will be held until closed session because of legal issues.

  1. Investigations Bureau. Deputy Chief Mark Francisco presented the Investigations Bureau report for July 2020.  He advised that to-date in 2020, there have been 127 homicides, compared to 98 at this time last year; there were 89 homicides for this same time frame in 2018, 99 in 2017, and 74 in 2016. There were 65 non-fatal shootings in July 2020, compared to 52 in July 2019.  There have been an additional 38 living victims in August 2020.  Deputy Chief Francisco advised there have been 301 drive by shootings year-to-date 2020, compared to 266 at this time last year.  There were 51 drive by shootings in July 2020, compared to 38 in July 2019.  Of the 51 drive by shootings in July 2020, 136 victims were identified; 16 of the victims sustained injuries.  There were 210 firearms recovered Department-wide in July 2020, compared to 234 in July 2019; 1,465 firearms have been recovered year-to-date 2020, compared to 1,383 for the same time frame in 2019.

        Deputy Chief Francisco provided an update on Operation LeGend.  Last week, the US Attorney announced there have been 288 arrests made in Operation LeGend; 61 of the arrests are federal defendants, and 24 were directly related to Kansas City homicides.  As of yesterday, there have been well over 300 arrests made.  Three of the homicide arrests were made out of state, including four-year-old LeGend Taliferro’s killer.   

  1. Administration Bureau. Deputy Chief Shawn Wadle presented the Regional Criminalistics Division Report for August 2020.  He advised that Crime Lab backlog is trending favorably, with the exception of DNA, trace, and latent prints.  Trace and latent prints are experiencing vacancies due to the hiring freeze.  Deputy Chief Wadle explained that the month of July 2020 was a very violent month, and DNA’s backlog grew nine percent; however, DNA testing and staff productivity grew by 24 percent.  In response to a question, Deputy Chief Wadle advised that federal assistance through Operation LeGend is helping with the Lab’s backlog. 

Deputy Chief Wadle presented the Human Resources Personnel Summary dated August 6, 2020.  For this time period, Department strength is 1,323 sworn law enforcement personnel; budgeted strength for law enforcement personnel is 1,375.  Deputy Chief Wadle explained that there are 21 Academy recruits that will graduate in September that will relieve a portion of the 52 vacancies.  For this time period, Department strength for career civilians is 563; budgeted strength for career civilians is 602. 

Deputy Chief Wadle explained that when Rick Smith was sworn in as Chief of Police in 2017, the Department’s budgeted strength for law enforcement personnel was 1,326; however, only 1,292 of those positions were filled, leaving 34 vacancies.  Also in 2017, the Department’s budgeted strength for career civilians was 580; however, only 512 of those positions were filled, leaving 68 vacancies.  Since 2017, the Department has gained 31 law enforcement employees and 51 career civilians.

Deputy Chief Wadle advised that during the time period of January – July 2017, there were 21 law enforcement retirements and 11 civilian retirements.  During the time period of January – July 2018, there were 17 law enforcement retirements and four civilian retirements.  During the period of January – July 2019, there were 14 law enforcement retirements and seven civilian retirements.  During the period of January – July 2020, there were 22 law enforcement retirements and seven civilian retirements. 

During the time period of January – July 2017, there were 11 law enforcement resignations, 17 civilian resignations, and seven police officer candidate resignations.  During the time period of January – July 2018, there were 25 law enforcement resignations, 30 civilian resignations, and seven police officer candidate resignations.  During the time period of January – July 2019, there were 16 law enforcement resignations, 24 civilian resignations, and ten police officer candidate resignations.  During the time period of January – July 2020, there were 13 law enforcement resignations, 23 civilian resignations, and eight police officer candidate resignations. 

The top two reasons for law enforcement resignations over the years were leaving for a better position and leaving the City with their family.  The top two reasons for civilian resignations over the years were dissatisfaction with work and/or supervision and leaving for better positions.  The top two reasons for police officer candidate resignations over the years were due to health reasons and family reasons.   

  1. Patrol Bureau. Deputy Chief Karl Oakman spoke about recent community events throughout the Patrol Division.  Deputy Chief Oakman presented the Monthly Crime Summary for June 2020.  Deputy Chief Oakman noted the increase of violent crimes are due to the increase of homicides and aggravated assaults.  Robberies, sex crimes, and property crimes are trending down from previous months.  Response times slightly increased, but are still lower than the response times in 2018 and 2019.  Total calls for service have slightly increased.  The 911 Call Center has received 557,335 calls year-to-date, and 237,963 of them were handled by alternative means. 

Deputy Chief Oakman presented the Traffic Summary for the month of July 2020.  Total citations in July 2020 totaled 8,959 compared to 15,131 in July 2019.  There have been 80,396 citations have been issued year-to-date 2020.  The average number of citations per stop in the month of July by Traffic Enforcement Officers was 1.37.  Deputy Chief Oakman noted that parking citations were down due to the stay-at-home order.  He also noted that a new supervisor was assigned to DUI.  The DUI Section has made 850 driving under the influence arrests this year; one officer in the Section made 217 of those DUI arrests by himself. There have been 62 fatality accidents to-date 2020, compared to 44 at this time last year.  Excessive speed, substance abuse, and inattention have been major contributing factors in the fatality accidents.

Deputy Chief Oakman gave kudos to the Academy Training Staff.  Recruits average 1,200 hours of training.  The Academy is 40 hours a week for 27 weeks.  By comparison, the average college bachelor’s degree consists of approximately 2,000 hours of classtime.    After Academy graduation, the new officers go through a break-in period with field training officers.  Deputy Chief Oakman explained that all of the officers in the last Academy class successfully made it through the break-in period, which rarely happens.  He credited the Academy Staff for their expertise in preparing these officers for the job. 

Deputy Chief Oakman emphasized the need for more officers and officer presence.  He explained that 67 percent of the homicides this year have occurred outside.  He believes maintaining high-visibility could potentially reduce the amount of homicides that occur outdoors. 

In response to a question from Commissioner Tolbert, Deputy Chief Oakman advised that the Community Interaction Officers (CIOs) at each Division station can provide information on neighborhood cleanups.   

  1. Consent Agenda. Acting Deputy Chief Gregory Dull presented the following consent agenda item for approval:
  2. Project #1320, Code of Ethics

        Commissioner Tolbert requested that additional language be added regarding recording of members.  This policy will be sent back to Executive Committee for additional review.  Mayor Lucas suggested that additional conversation in regard to these changes happen in closed session.

  1. Office of Community Complaints. Director Merrell Bennekin presented the OCC Monthly Report for July 2020.  Director Bennekin also presented a memorandum dated August 18, 2020, regarding the Office of Community Complaints Website Proposal.  The OCC requested bids for the development of a new website for the agency.  The companies were contacted based on samples of their work, recommendations, and the ability to complete the project in an expedited manner according to specifications.  Based on the proposals, the OCC recommends that Tekki, LLC be awarded the contract to develop the Office’s website.  The proposal from Tekki, LLC includes an online complaint form, an FAQ page, social media links and feed, interactive maps, document sharing capabilities, a language translator, along with many other features. 

        The initial project total is $8,600, with an annual fee of $799.  The OCC has not yet identified funding, and was not considered in the current budget.  A motion was made by Commissioner Dean, with a second by Commissioner Tolbert, to approve the website proposal as presented and award the project to Tekki, LLC.  The vote was 5-0 in favor.   

  1. Mayor Quinton Lucas. Mayor Lucas spoke about the City budget cuts.  He expects a $60 million shortfall in next year’s budget.  He also encouraged continued conversations regarding reimbursement from City Aviation and KCPD personnel station at the airport. 
  2. Scheduled meetings. The Board of Police Commissioners of Kansas City, Missouri has scheduled the following meetings:

 

Regular Meetings:

September 29, 2020, 9:30 a.m., at City Hall Council Chambers – 26th Floor, 414 E. 12th Street, Kansas City.

October 27, 2020, 9:30 a.m., at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust, Kansas City.

November 10, 2020, 9:30 a.m., at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust, Kansas City.

December 8, 2020, 9:30 a.m., at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust, Kansas City.

 

            A motion was made by Commissioner Tolbert, with a second by Commissioner Garrett, and by vote indicated below, to adjourn its open meeting at 12:27 p.m. and reconvene in closed session as provided in the following resolution.  Following a roll call, the vote was 5-0 in favor.

RESOLUTION

WHEREAS, notice of the board meeting of the Board of Police Commissioners was given on February 19, 2020, and

WHEREAS, said notice indicated that the Board of Police Commissioners might go into closed session during said meeting, and

WHEREAS, notice of the closed meeting follows the guidelines of Section 610.020 of the Revised Statutes of Missouri.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of Police Commissioners go into closed session during the meeting being held on  Tuesday, August 25, 2020, at KCPD Headquarters, Community Room, 1125 Locust Street, Kansas City, for the purpose of discussing personnel matters, labor negotiations, and litigation matters.

The following Commissioners were present and voted to go into closed session as follows:   

        Commissioner Don Wagner                          -       Aye

        Commissioner Mark Tolbert                          -       Aye

        Commissioner Cathy Dean                           -       Aye

Commissioner Nathan Garrett                       -       Aye

        Mayor Quinton Lucas                                 -       Aye

        There being a quorum present and the question of holding a closed session having received an affirmative public vote of at least three (3) members, a closed meeting was held as set forth above.

Below are the votes from the closed session of the Board of Police Commissioners meeting on August 25, 2020:

The Board went into closed session at 12:42 p.m.  Commissioner Garrett left the meeting at 2:05 p.m. 

1)      Following a motion by Mayor Lucas and a second by Commissioner Tolbert, the Board voted to approve the Duty-Related Disability Retirement of xxxx [Name redacted for privacy and confidentiality reasons].  The vote was 4-0 in favor.  Following polling, Mayor Lucas voted Aye, Commissioner Dean voted Aye, Commissioner Tolbert voted Aye, and Commissioner Wagner voted Aye.

2)      Following a motion by Commissioner Tolbert and a second by Mayor Lucas, the Board voted to approve the continued employment of Captain Donald Jantzen and Detective Ernest Baskerville.  The vote was 4-0 in favor.  Following polling, Mayor Lucas voted Aye, Commissioner Wagner voted Aye, Commissioner Dean voted Aye, and Commissioner Tolbert voted Aye.

3)      Following a motion by Commissioner Dean and a second by Mayor Lucas, the Board voted to approve a memorandum of understanding with the FBI for building improvements at a covert facility.  The vote was 4-0 in favor.  Following polling, Mayor Lucas voted Aye, Commissioner Wagner voted Aye, Commissioner Dean voted Aye, and Commissioner Tolbert voted Aye.

4)      Following a motion by Commissioner Dean and a second by Mayor Lucas, the Board voted to approve the minutes of the closed session of the Board of Police Commissioners on July 7, 2020.  The vote was 4-0 in favor.  Following polling, Mayor Lucas voted Aye, Commissioner Wagner voted Aye, Commissioner Dean voted Aye, and Commissioner Tolbert voted Aye.

5)      Following a motion by Commissioner Dean and a second by Mayor Lucas, the Board voted to go into special closed session.  The vote was 4-0 in favor.  Following polling, Mayor Lucas voted Aye, Commissioner Wagner voted Aye, Commissioner Dean voted Aye, and Commissioner Tolbert voted Aye.

6)      Following a motion by Mayor Lucas and a second by Commissioner Tolbert, the Board voted to come out of special closed session and adjourn.  The vote was 4-0 in favor.  Following polling, Mayor Lucas voted Aye, Commissioner Wagner voted Aye, Commissioner Dean voted Aye, and Commissioner Tolbert voted Aye.

The meeting adjourned at 3:08 p.m.      

 

President

________________________________

Secretary/Attorney      

________________________________